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Storage

Find storage options from mechanical, solid-state and NAS.

 
 

Storage Type

Shop our range of storage types, whether that's 3.5" Hard Drives or slim NVMe SSDs.

Portable/External Hard Drives

Portable and convenient, allowing you to take your files anywhere.

SD and microSD Cards

Used in cameras, smartphones and even in some laptop models.

Solid State Drives (SSD)

Extremely fast and silent, and essential for slim builds and fast app launching.

USB/USB-C Drives

These are handy for carrying around and work with virtually every PC.

Mechnical Hard Drives (HDD)

Work great for backups as they provide lots of storage for cheaper prices.

NAS (Network Attached Storage)

Used for backing up data and sharing them using your network.

 

Storage Type

Shop our range of storage types, whether that's 3.5" Hard Drives or slim NVMe SSDs.

External Hard-Drive

External drives are portable and convenient, allowing you to take your files anywhere (typically with a USB or USB-C connection).

SD Cards

Many portable devices can be expanded through the use of SD cards. There are two varieties - ordinary, and microSD cards.

Solid State Drives

Solid state drives (SSDs) are among the fastest storage mediums you can own. Most modern laptops/PCs have them installed.

USB Drives

Everyone has probably used one of these. They're small and portable, but don't have as much capacity as other types of storage.

Internal Hard-Drive

Internal hard-drives are mounted inside your desktop or laptop. They are used to store your PC's files and operating system.

NAS

Network Attached Storage (NAS) devices are generally used for storage, file backup and a multimedia streaming server.

 
 

What about NAS?

Our NAS Buying Guide explains how Network Attached Storage works, including:

  • What is a NAS?
  • How can you use a NAS?
  • Why might you want one?

If you're looking for a reliable way to backup your files or even operate a home streaming server, this guide is for you.

 

Storage on Sale

We sell a variety of monitors from leading brands.

LG

ASUS

HP

Samsung

Dell

 

Storage Basics

How much storage do I need?

It depends on what you're going to need storage for. A smaller, faster hard drive is great for running your operating system, while a larger one is perfect for file storage.

Why do I need data backup?

A hard drive stores all of your important data, but storing it all on one drive is risky. We recommend keeping at least on extra copy of your files on another hard drive (or using a NAS).

What does a hard drive do?

Hard drives store all of our digital data and content. Every document, app, photo and file on your device is stored onto a hard drive. Drives can be attached internally, or externally.

How important is speed?

Speed is important in scenarios where you want to load things fast. We recommend using a fast drive for your Windows/Mac/Linux install. For file storage, speed doesn't matter quite as much.

 
 

What does a hard drive do?

Hard drives store all of our digital data and content. Every document, app, photo and file on your device is stored onto a hard drive. Drives can be attached internally, or externally.

How much storage do I need?

It depends on what you're going to need storage for. A smaller, faster hard drive is great for running your operating system, while a larger one is perfect for file storage.

Why do I need data backup?

A hard drive stores all of your important data, but storing it all on one drive is risky. We recommend keeping at least on extra copy of your files on another hard drive (or using a NAS).

SSD Types and Form Factors

What are the differences between M.2, mSATA, SATA and NVMe SSDs?

Which SSD should I buy?

Many customers prefer SSDs for their speed, reliability, and durability. However, they are often faced with challenges when deciding which SSD to purchase. Not all solid state drives are the same. Some are faster than others, and some will refuse to work (or work at a limited capacity) on your existing hardware. 

There are many differences between SSDs. The main things you should be looking out for include:

  • Form factor: the physical dimensions of your SSD determines where it can fit on existing computers. There are many dimensions for SSDs:
    • 2.5" SSDs
    • M.2 SATA and NVMe SSDs (4 different types)
    • mSATA SSDs
  • SATA or NVMe: SATA drives can only reach a maximum of 600Mbps transfer speeds. NVMe drives are newer and up to 7x faster.
  • Write Cycles: this determines how much data an SSD is designed to handle in it's lifetime. All SSDs have a finite life cycle, but they are typically rated to last at least 10 years (or more) of average consumer use.

Differences between SSD types will be explained further below.

Key Differences Between NVMe and SATA SSDs

SSDs can use one of two methods for communicating with your PC: SATA, and NVMe. SATA is an older standard, and slower than NVMe. While SATA SSDs can transfer data at a theoretical maximum rate of 600Mbps, NVMe SSDs can attain speeds of 7.5Gbps.

SATA and NVMe SSDs can come in different form factors. SATA drives can come in 2.5", M.2 or mSATA form factors. NVMe drives, on the other hand, are typically only used with an M.2 form factor.

Form Factors: 2.5", M.2 and mSATA

You often hear of M.2 SSDs, or mSATA SSDs. What do they mean, and how important are they?

M.2, mSATA and 2.5" refer to different SSD form factors. You may only use an M.2 drive in an M.2 slot, for example.

  • M.2 SSDs: These SSDs are commonly used in laptops. They are small in size, and can communicate either using SATA or NVMe. It's important to check if your M.2 socket is compatible with both SATA and NVMe drives (some are only compatible with one or the other). To check, refer to the diagram below. M.2 SATA SSDs are "B + M" keyed, while M.2 NVMe SSDs are only "M" keyed
  • mSATA SSDs: mSATA was originally the smallest SSD form factor. It was the precursor to M.2, which succeeded the mSATA format. As the name implies, mSATA SSDs use the SATA interface for communication. This limits their transfer speeds to 600Mbps. Since its replacement by the newer (and faster) M.2 standard, mSATA SSDs are rarely found in today's market.
  • 2.5" SSDs: A 2.5" SSD is physically larger than an M.2 or mSATA SSD, but smaller than a 3.5" traditional hard drive. All 2.5" SSDs are SATA, and thus are limited in speed (though still much faster than a traditional spinning mechanical drive). The image below demonstrates how 2.5" SSDs look like: 
 

Storage on Sale

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